HURRICANE KATRINA Gras
MAD ALEX PHOTOGRAPHY > HURRICANE KATRINA Gras
I was profoundly touched by the many things that I saw and experienced in New Orleans. These are images from this year's post-Katrina Mardi Gras and other happenings around the city. These amazing people were full of good cheer, Southern hospitality, and biting sarcasm. These people liked to put their tongue right where it belongs...planted firmly in their cheek.
Toward the end of my trip, I took a taxi into a place where Katrina left her strongest mark. Please realize that my pictures of the devastation in the 9th Ward do it no justice. Imagine Hiroshima. What I saw was complete and utter devastation for miles and miles and miles. The few homes that were still were somewhat intact structurally, had been submerged in up to 10 feet of water for about a month. Hundreds of abandoned cars litter the neighborhood. I saw overturned buses. Most of New Orleans, however, has recovered rather nicely.
Mardi Gras blew my mind. I've lived in Las Vegas for almost 8 years so I thought I was prepared. It was much more massive that I expected. My only advice: If you happen to go, try hanging out Uptown...that's where most locals are...as well as the pretty girls! Look out for a few more new photos from the "Big Easy." I have a couple more that I have yet to edit. Enjoy these images.
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Make Levees, Not War


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Bourbon St.


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A nice lady watching one of the many Mardi Gras parades. I didn't pose her at all...this is exactly how I found her.


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A reveler on Bourbon St. on Fat Tuesday.


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A home in the infamous 9th Ward. This neighborhood is where Hurricane Katrina wreaked the most havoc. Most homes in this neighborhood were completely flattened. This is one of the exceptions. Marines painted notes on homes when looking for survivors.


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"Queen" Victoria


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The President celebrating Mardi Gras.


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A part-time showgirl.


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Drunk Freak Part One


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Drunk Freak Part Two


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More wreckage in the 9th Ward.


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A funny thing happened on the way to church...


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New employees from the Dubai port deal.


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An amazing man and one of his daughters in the front yard of his St. Charles home. This man works at the church pictured below. He and his family remain optimistic about recovery from Katrina. 150 friends and family celebrated Mardi Gras at his house


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One of the three Asians that attended Mardi Gras.


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A colorful couple.


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A hero. This man lives in a rebuilt home in the 9th ward with a few other volunteers. Against all rhyme and reason, they work every day to try to bring some improvement to the miles of bleak devistation that surrounds them.


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A couple of macho guys on Bourbon St.


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Trying to get a better glimpse of the parade...


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This is a bridge over the Mississippi River. In the distance is one of the first levees that broke. Beyond it is the neighborhood of the 9th Ward. Straight ahead is where a barge from the river went through the leeve and floated in the neighborhood


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Girls on Bourbon


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The Holy Trinity


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A gentleman that kept on his parade outfit long after the parade was over.


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Good sounds on Bourbon...


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Food For Thought Part 1


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Food For Thought Part 2


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A nice older gentleman walking in a neighborhood near St. Charles. Over the wall on his right is a beautiful New Orleans cemetery.


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This is Toby. Toby is a hero. This home is a rebuilt home in the 9th Ward where he and other volunteers live. The signs in their yard are a response to the city's wish to bulldoze all homes in the 9th Ward. Toby wants to save all the homes he can.


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Beads...lots of beads.


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Hands reaching for beads during a parade on Canal St.


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This is a church on St. Charles and is one of the very first Protestant churches in New Orleans. It is 130 years old.


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I think this speaks for itself.


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Toby and another volunteer walking down a street in the 9th Ward.


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A street performer on Bourbon St.


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This is Bourbon St. about an hour after the end of Mardi Gras (1:00 A.M. Ash Wednesday Morning).


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